Search
Take Action!

We encourage our members to comment and provide Heartfelt solutions to a "better" way.  A Member Account is required to post Heartfelt comments.

Login to post a comment or access member-exclusive resources

or

Register to become a member.

Benefits of membership include free exclusive resources including videos, exercises, quizzes and step-by-step tips to bring out the Heartfelt Leader in you and a guide to creating and leading a Heartfelt Leadership community in your part of the world.  Once you are registered and logged in, "Member Resources" under the "Connect" tab will be visible.

Sunday
Jan062013

Human -- for better or worse

Op-Ed - Los Angeles Times - Sunday, January 6, 2013

Human -- for better or worse

Scientists examining our moral core study intuition and calculated analysis to try to determine whether we are naturally good or bad.

 Scientists such as Jonathan Haidt of New York University have shown that we frequently feel rather than think our way to moral judgments; in general, the more affective parts of our brains generate quick, intuitive, moral decisions ("I can't tell you why, but that is wrong, wrong, wrong"), while the more cognitive parts play catch-up milliseconds to years later to come up with logical rationales for our gut intuitions. (Illustration by Donald Kilpatrick / For The Times)

 Are people, by nature, kind or rotten? This question has kept philosophers, theologians, social scientists and writers busy for millenniums.

A vote for our basic rottenness comes from scholars such as Steven Pinker of Harvard, who has documented how it is the regulating forces of society, rather than human nature, that have brought a decline in human violence over the centuries. A vote for our basic decency comes, surprisingly, from work by primatologists such as Frans de Waal of Emory University, who have observed that other primates display the basics of altruism, reciprocity, empathy and a sense of justice. Those virtues have a long legacy that precedes humans.

Continue Reading

Reader Comments

There are no comments for this journal entry. To create a new comment, use the form below.
Member Account Required
You must have a member account on this website in order to post comments. Log in to your account to enable posting. If you do not have an account, register to get one.
« "Is Daddy an A-hole?" | Main | 2013 - The Year of Living Unselfishly »